Tag: heart attack

Genetic Testing Identifies High Cholesterol Risk, Preventing Heart Events
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Genetic Testing Identifies High Cholesterol Risk, Preventing Heart Events

"Most of these patients already had tests that showed they had high cholesterol," said Stacey Knight, PhD, cardiovascular and genetic epidemiologist at Intermountain Health. "Our findings show that we should be genetic testing people who have unexplained high cholesterol, so we can aggressively treat it and cut down their risk of having a major heart event." Findings were presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2023 in Philadelphia.Findings from the study come from the HerediGene: Population Study, one of the world's largest DNA mapping initiatives, which is a partnership between Intermountain Health and Icelandic company deCODE. Advertisement The goal of the project is to discover new connections b...
Summer Wildfires and Winter Air Pollution Pose Varied Heart Health Risks
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Summer Wildfires and Winter Air Pollution Pose Varied Heart Health Risks

Findings from the Intermountain research were presented in a pair of studies at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2023, which is being held in Philadelphia. In the first study, researchers from Intermountain examined the association between fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone air pollution, and hospitalizations for unstable angina (unstable chest pain that does not result in organ damage) and acute myocardial infarction (heart attack in which part of the muscle dies) during two distinct seasons in Utah when these types of pollution is at higher levels. Seasonal Impact: Investigating Patient Health Amidst Summer Wildfires and Winter Inversions Researchers studied patients during summer wildfire season (June to October), an...
Increased Blood Transfusion Benefits Heart Attack Patients With Anemia
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Increased Blood Transfusion Benefits Heart Attack Patients With Anemia

"Transfusion threshold trials are important to help physicians inform decisions that provide the most benefit for their patients," said Carson. "The goal of the MINT trial was to establish evidence that can be used to set transfusion standards for patients who have had a heart attack, to improve their rate of survival and reduce the risk of additional heart attacks." The MINT trial evaluated two transfusion strategies in more than 3,500 enrolled participants at 144 hospitals in six countries. Half of the participants in the study were given more blood to keep their blood count greater than 10 grams per deciliter (g/dL), considered a liberal transfusion strategy. Half didn't receive blood unless their blood count was less than eight g/dL, the restrictive transfusion strategy. All ...
Increased Heart Disease Risk Tied to Food Allergy
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Increased Heart Disease Risk Tied to Food Allergy

An overlooked factor in heart disease, sensitivity to common food allergens like dairy and peanuts may elevate the risk of cardiovascular death, even in individuals without apparent allergies, a new study has said. According to the study published in the journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, this increased risk may be comparable to -- or even exceed -- the risks posed by smoking, diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis. Antibody Response to Common Foods Researchers looked at thousands of adults over time and found that people who produced antibodies in response to dairy and other foods were at elevated risk of cardiovascular-related death. The strongest link was for cow's milk, but other allergens such as peanuts and shrimp were also significant. "What we looked a...
Coronary Calcium Scores Highly Effective in Identifying Heart Disease Without Known Risk Factors
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Coronary Calcium Scores Highly Effective in Identifying Heart Disease Without Known Risk Factors

Findings from the study were presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2023 in Philadelphia on Nov 11, 2023. In the study, Intermountain researchers identified 429 heart attack patients who also had coronary artery calcium scans. Of those, 369 had standard modifiable risk factors (SMuRF), like a diagnosis or treatment of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and or smoking; and 60 did not (SMuRF-less). Advertisement Researchers examined these patients' calcium artery scan scores, and then also major adverse cardiovascular events, like another heart attack, stroke, or death, at 60-days and long term. Researchers found that SMuRF-less patients had high rates of, and higher percentile of, co...